Speech Therapy Activities: 14 Articulation Exercises for Kids

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Speech Therapy Activities | Whether your child struggles with the articulation of certain letters and sounds, needs help with fluency, has difficulty with voice regulation, finds it challenging to understand and express himself throughout language, or has nonverbal autism, these speech therapy activities for toddlers, preschool, kindergarten, and elementary school offer a fun way to help kids at home and in the classroom!

If you’re looking for speech therapy activities you can do at home, in a clinical setting, or within the classroom, you’ve come to the right place. From fun and exciting articulation exercises and games to help develop and teach proper articulation, fluency, and voice regulation, to targeted speech therapy exercises geared toward developing a child’s ability to understand and express emotions through language, this collection of speech therapy activities offers a great way to help children learn and develop through play!

What is speech therapy?

Most people assume speech therapy is focused solely on the development of proper articulation and the correction of speech challenges like stutters and lisps, and while speech therapy certainly helps with speech issues such as these, the work of speech therapists and speech and language pathologists (SLPs) goes much deeper.

In addition to improving speech, speech therapy can also help an individual understand and express themselves through language, which in turn can help with things like reading comprehension, writing, and spelling. Speech therapists can also help develop communication in individuals who are non-verbal, and help treat those with swallowing and feeding disorders.

At home speech therapy

While there are many at home speech therapy games, activities, and toys children with speech challenges can benefit from, you must consult with a trained speech therapist or speech and language pathologist first to determine the scope of your child’s challenges and put together a proper treatment plan. Once that’s in place, there are HEAPS of ways you can help support your child’s speech therapy sessions at home, and we’re excited to share some of our favorites with you!

Note: I am not a therapist or a doctor, I do not have a background in childhood education, and I do not endorse the use of any of the therapies, activities, games, or toys discussed on this website. If you suspect you or your child has a developmental delay or other underlying medical condition, please consult with a trained professional before trying any of these ideas at home.

Speech therapy activities

One of the things I love about Pinterest is that it is FILLED with all kinds of fun activities for kids that help them practice certain skills without them even realizing! There are lots of brilliant speech therapy activities you can do at home to help develop your child’s articulation, language development, reading comprehension, and writing skills, and you don’t need to purchase fancy speech therapy toys to enjoy them. You can improvise with games and toys you probably already have lying around the house, and we’ve even found printables you can download for free.

Learn with Mr. Potato Head. There are so many toys and games that can be adapted for speech therapy, and this post on The Dabbling Speechie will inspire you to get your hands on a Mr. Potato Head set if you don’t already own one!

Read. Repetitive books are a great way to practice articulation, and there are heaps of great children’s books that focus on particular sounds to help with speech therapy, including:

Fun with Straws. Drinking different textures through a drinking straw, or blowing air through a straw to move objects like pom poms are both great ways to develop a child’s oral muscles.

Mini Golf. Grab a set of kids’ golf clubs and set-up this Speech Put Put Game by The Speech Girls!

Duplo Letter Sound Matching. This beginners phonics activity by This Reading Mama offers a great way to practice different sounds with your child. All you need is a pack of LEGO Duplo Basic Bricks, and you can adjust this activity to target all kinds of tricky sounds and words!

Voice-O-Meter Voice Chart. If your child struggles to regulate his or her voice, and can’t distinguish between what an ‘indoor’ and ‘outdoor’ voice sounds like, this Voice-O-Meter Voice Chart on Teachers Pay Teachers is a great place to start!

Sing Songs. All of those silly songs your kids sing in preschool like ‘Row Row Row Your Boat’, ‘Twinkle Twinkle Little Start’, and ‘The Itsy Bitsy Spider’ aren’t just for fun. They also help develop language skills! Don’t be afraid to make up your own words and melodies to help practice the sounds your child struggles with most, and remember to keep it fun and engaging so it doesn’t feel like practice.

Poetry. Yes, you read that right. Poetry can help teach things like decoding, fluency, and sight words, and this post on Create Dream Explore will teach you exactly how you can turn poetry into speech therapy activities!

Hot Chocolate Articulation Craftivity. This free printable on Teachers Pay Teachers offers a fun way to practice 20 different S-blend words!

Articulation Bowling. Grab a plastic bowling set and make this Articulation Bowling Activity I found on Consonantly Speaking. It’s one of those easy-to-make activities that keeps kids interested and motivated, which is a win-win in my book!

Roll and Retell. An Apple for the Teacher has a great Roll and Retell activity that helps children discuss and summarize the things they read before putting their thoughts on paper.

WH-Questions Pizza Party! Another freebie, this speech therapy game on Teachers Pay Teachers targets basic WH- and How-Questions to help with language development, reading comprehension, etc.

Play-Doh Mats. Play-Doh offers a calming sensory activity to do both in the classroom and at home, and these Free Digraph Mats by Playdough to Plato can be used to teach tricky sounds to kids who struggle with articulation. Playdough to Plato also offers a Digraph Activity Set, which includes 10 motivating digraph activities to learn the most popular digraphs in words: CH, CK, KN, NG, PH, QU, SH, TH, and WH. Get your copy HERE.

Mega Fluency Pack. If your child struggles with fluency, this Mega Fluency Packet for Speech and Language Therapy on Teachers Pay Teachers helps kids who struggle with things like repetition, interjection, prolongation, and circumlocution.

Whether your child struggles to articulate certain letters and sounds, needs help with fluency, has difficulty with voice regulation, finds it challenging to understand and express himself through language, or is completely nonverbal, these speech therapy activities offer a fun way to help develop the skills he needs for ongoing success.

Remember to practice often, to keep it fun, and to remember these inspiring words by Peter F. Drucker:

‘The most important thing in communication is to hear what isn’t being said.’

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If you found this collection of speech therapy activities helpful, please share this post on Pinterest!

Speech Therapy Activities | Whether your child struggles with the articulation of certain letters and sounds, needs help with fluency, has difficulty with voice regulation, finds it challenging to understand and express himself throughout language, or has nonverbal autism, these speech therapy activities for toddlers, preschool, kindergarten, and elementary school offer a fun way to help kids at home and in the classroom!

And if you’re looking for more ways to have fun at home with your kids, please follow our Kids board where we share all kinds of fabulous ideas!



Gwen
Gwen
Gwen is a 40-something freelance writer and social media consultant who has an unhealthy love for makeup, hair, and fashion. She lives with her husband and 8-year-old daughter in Toronto, Canada and hopes to move to a warmer climate someday. Preferably tomorrow.