How to deal with autism: 21+ tools to calm an autistic meltdown

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Looking for calming strategies for kids? We’ve got 21+ ideas to help children with anger management issues as a result of autism, anxiety, ADHD, and other special needs. Perfect for parents and teachers alike, these activities will help your child with self-regulation when big emotions become too much. Keep a set of these tools at home, in the classroom, and in the car so you’re always prepared and remember: while it may be difficult to learn how to deal with autism, you WILL find your way.

If you’re a parent of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), knowing how to deal with autism can be overwhelming. From coming to terms with the diagnosis and understanding what the long-term implications are, to putting together a treatment plan and navigating school options, supports, and individualized education plans (IEPs), being the parent of a special needs child is not for the faint of heart. And let’s not forget about the financial stresses and day-to-day care that is required!

Autism is all-consuming, and while there are tons of resources out their to teach you how to manage a child with autism, there is no ‘one size fits all’ solution, and finding out what does and doesn’t work for your individual child will not be an overnight process. Parenting a child with ASD takes a lot of time and patience, and while it can feel isolating and lonely, I’m here to tell you it doesn’t need to be.

If you’re reading this post, you’re looking for suggestions on how to calm an autistic meltdown, and I have 21+ ideas that will (hopefully) change your life.

Most, if not all, parents and caregivers of children aged 2 and older have experienced some sort of temper tantrum in their lifetime, but very few people understand the difference between a tantrum and an autistic meltdown. On the surface, they look pretty similar, but while temper tantrums are often goal-driven behaviors that are fuelled by an audience, autistic meltdowns typically occur in response to feelings of overwhelm and occur with or without spectators.

And while the severity of a temper tantrum can typically be controlled through rewards and bribes, there is no end goal in an autistic meltdown other than gaining control over an overwhelming situation, and little can be done once an individual with ASD is in a state of distress.

But there are things we as parents can do to help prevent a full-blown autistic meltdown from escalating, and there are tools we can keep at our disposal to help lessen the magnitude of a meltdown once it starts.

I’ve put all of this information together in my eBook, How to Calm an Autistic Meltdown, which includes 21+ ‘Calm Down Box’ ideas that help promote a sense of calm in individuals on the autism spectrum.

Want a free copy?

Simply sign-up for our weekly autism newsletter by clicking the button below and you will receive a PDF download in your inbox within minutes!

Being the parent of a child with special needs isn’t easy, and trying to figure out how to deal with autism can be isolating and lonely. But it doesn’t need to be! Our weekly emails are designed to help inspire moms and dads whose parenting journey has been more complicated with most, and we have tons of great advice, kids activities, and laughter to share with you each week.

A wise person once said, ‘Autism is about having a pure heart and being very sensitive… It is about finding a way to survive in an overwhelming, confusing world… It is about developing differently, in a different pace and with different leaps.’

I hope our tips help you figure out how to deal with autistic meltdowns in the best way possible, and that you’ll allow us to continue to motivate and inspire you to help your child reach his or her greatest potential.

If you found our eBook helpful, please share this post on Pinterest!

Looking for calming strategies for kids? We’ve got 21+ ideas to help children with anger management issues as a result of autism, anxiety, ADHD, and other special needs. Perfect for parents and teachers alike, these activities will help your child with self-regulation when big emotions become too much. Keep a set of these tools at home, in the classroom, and in the car so you’re always prepared and remember: while it may be difficult to learn how to deal with autism, you WILL find your way.

And if you’re looking for more autism tips and tricks, please follow our autism board where we share all kinds of fabulous ideas!

Gwen
Gwen
Gwen is a 40-something freelance writer and social media consultant who has an unhealthy love for makeup, hair, and fashion. She lives with her husband and 8-year-old daughter in Toronto, Canada and hopes to move to a warmer climate someday. Preferably tomorrow.