Fact or Fiction: 11 Food Myths Explained

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Fact or Fiction: 11 Food Myths Debunked | Trying to lose weight but not seeing the results you hoped for? They say that weight loss is 80% diet and only 20% exercise, so knowing what you should and shouldn't eat is key. This post explains common food myths to help you make healthy food choices for weight loss that lasts. Carbs do NOT make you fat. Coffee CAN be good for you. Eggs AREN'T the devil. And going gluten-free should be reserved only for those who need to. Click to read more!

Food is a major part of everyone’s life, so it’s important to get the facts straight when it comes to food myths. You could be leaving things out of your diet that are essential to your health, or eating things you think are healthy but really aren’t, due to common misconceptions about food. Today’ we’re debunking 11 common food myths and telling you what the facts are instead.

11 Food Myths Explained

Myth #1: Coffee is Unhealthy

Due to the high caffeine content coffee has, there’s a misconception that it’s unhealthy. However, coffee is rich in antioxidants and may help fight certain health conditions like Altzheimer’s, heart disease and stroke. Coffee also boosts your metabolism, improves memory and increases fat burning. Coffee that’s filled with sugar and cream on the other hand, probably isn’t doing you any favours.

Myth #2: Red Meat is Bad For You

Although it’s true that a diet high in red meat can lead to cardiovascular disease, it’s healthy to eat lean beef in moderation. Red meat is packed with essential nutrients including vitamin B12, iron, zinc, and selenium, and is particularly important for those who have iron deficiency anemia.

Myth #3: Gluten-Free Food is Better For You

Unless you have a gluten intolerance or have been diagnosed with celiac disease (in which case you should definitely eat a gluten-free diet), gluten-free food is not necessarily better for you. Those who aren’t able to digest gluten have to stay away from rye, wheat and barley, but the rest of the population can benefit from the fibre and other nutrients found in these foods. Also keep in mind, commercially-prepared gluten free snacks are typically high in refined carbs, sugar, fat and salt.

Myth #4: You Shouldn’t Eat Eggs Because of Their Cholesterol

Yes, eggs do have cholesterol, but they’re actually quite healthy for you when eaten in moderation. They’re highly nutrient-dense, containing zinc and iron, vitamin D, and antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin. Egg yolks are also rich in the brain-boosting chemical choline, which is also essential for muscle function. One whole egg or two egg whites a day can be part of a healthy diet.

Myth #5: Eating Carbs Will Make You Fat

The truth is, there are different types of carbohydrates and whether a carb will lead to weight gain depends entirely on what type of carb it is. If you eat tons of creamy pastas or snack on sugary scones from Starbucks, then these carbs will pack on the pounds if not enjoyed in moderation. However, healthy carbs like quinoa, oats, beans and legumes are essential and necessary for all around health.

Myth #6: Sugar-Free and Fat-Free Are Better For You

People often opt for sugar-free and fat-free foods because they think they’re better for them, but that couldn’t be farther from the truth. If something is labeled sugar-free, it means the sugar is removed, but it’s replaced with harmful chemicals. Fat-free food often goes through a process that removes all of the nutritional fat and typically replaces it with lots of harmful sugars.

Myth #7: Nuts are Junk Food

Quite the contrary, actually. Nuts are an excellent source of protein and other nutrients. They’re full of heart healthy polyunsaturated fatty acids and minerals like calcium and potassium. When eaten regularly, nuts have been found to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Keep your servings to a handful and you’re all set!

Myth #8: Carrots Can Improve Your Eyesight

Although it would be great if eating carrots could improve your eyesight, this is a common misconception. Carrots are rich in betacarotene, an orange pigment that our bodies can convert into vitamin A. Vitamin A is essential for good eye health, however eating more of it will not improve your eyesight. Along with betacarotene, carrots are also high in lutein, and both are antioxidants that can help prevent eye damage from free radicals. A high count of free radicals can lead to eye diseases. So carrots can help protect your eyes, but don’t expect to magically not need glasses anymore because of them.

Myth #9: Alcohol Will Help You Sleep Better

While many people think a glass of wine or scotch will relax you and help you drift off to sleep, drinking alcohol before bed can disrupt your sleep cycle and cause wakefulness and insomnia, as well as aggravate breathing-related sleep problems. Even though it may help you fall asleep at first, you’re more likely to wake up in the middle of the night and have trouble falling back to sleep.

Myth #10: Frozen Fruits and Veggies Are Less Nutritious Than Fresh Ones

Fruits and vegetables are an essential part of a healthy diet and you should eat them as much as you can, whether they’re fresh or frozen. There are very few nutrients that are deactivated when these foods are frozen and some nutrients disappear when cooked, but overall fruits and veggies are super nutritious and you should get them as you can.

Myth #11: Nighttime Eating Leads to Weight Gain

You’re sure to have heard this one time and time again, but it’s actually more about what you eat than when you eat. Our bodies store any extra calories as fat, so if your calorie input exceeds your calorie output, you’re more likely weight gain no matter what time of day you eat. If you eat within your daily calorie needs, you won’t gain weight, however, studies have found that late night eaters make poorer food choices and eat more calories, which in turn can lead to weight gain and is likely where this myth comes from.

Debunking these food myths is sure to change your eating patterns for the better. We hope you learned something from this post and can make any necessary changes moving forward.

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Fact or Fiction: 11 Food Myths Debunked | Trying to lose weight but not seeing the results you hoped for? They say that weight loss is 80% diet and only 20% exercise, so knowing what you should and shouldn't eat is key. This post explains common food myths to help you make healthy food choices for weight loss that lasts. Carbs do NOT make you fat. Coffee CAN be good for you. Eggs AREN'T the devil. And going gluten-free should be reserved only for those who need to. Click to read more!

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